Is Asia’s Golden Age Already Ending?

January 12, 2017

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If you follow international affairs, it often feels like you can’t go to a lecture or read an article without being told that the world’s economic and military center of gravity is shifting from West to East. Michael Auslin takes a different view in his new book, The End of the Asian Century: War, Stagnation, and the Risks to the World’s Most Dynamic Region (Yale University Press, 2017). We sat down at the Tabard Inn in Washington, DC to talk about it. Auslin argues that Asia’s golden age is over and the region is likely to be approaching an era of instability when it comes to economies, political systems, demographics, and war. Our conversation ranged broadly from U.S. interests in the region, the state of America’s alliances, China’s anxieties, and President Obama’s missed opportunities.

We also preview a new series on “Reclaiming Realism” and I tease a new bi-weekly podcast we have rolling out early next week called Bombshell. Have a listen!

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Produced by Tré Hester

Image: State Department

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2 thoughts on “Is Asia’s Golden Age Already Ending?

  1. So, I never hear anyone talking about the really nasty strain of nationalism that the folks in charge are playing with in China. If you want my historical view on it, there is a lot of echoes with damn Germany. Claims all over the place, a historical grudge with lots of the local neighbors. And to top it off, salami slicing in regions where they think they can get away with it. As per their damn constructed islands, totally obvious after the fact, they want the equivalent of an aircraft carrier in that position. Building an island is way cheaper than building a ship, and if precise strike is to be believed, it won’t make a damn bit of difference if said aircraft carting island can’t move, the real issue in a war would be repair and cost.

  2. Thoroughly enjoyed this perspective, appreciate you giving it an audience as we consider how to actually move forward from the realms where the previous administration was less-than-active (or at the least, as the discussion underscored, the perception by policymakers, foreign and domestic).